Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
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Education au/in Canada

www.educationau-incanada.ca

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions for Students

View: Questions for educational institutions and associations

Q: How can I get a scholarship or bursary to study in Canada?

A: There is information about scholarships, bursaries and fellowships at our Study in Canada web portal.

Many educational institutions in Canada also have scholarships for international students. You will need to contact the institutions directly where you plan to apply for study to find out more about what scholarships or bursaries they have available. You can find the contact information for each university when you do a search for programs at the Study in Canada website. Just click on the name of the university in the program list and it will link you directly to the university's web site and contact information.

Q: I have been accepted by an educational institution in Canada. Will the certification I get after finishing my study program be recognised in other countries?

A: An education from an accredited Canadian institution will be recognised by employers and institutions around the world. To see if the institution where you plan to study is accredited, you can check the Directory of Universities, Colleges and Schools in the Provinces and Territories of Canada on the website of the Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials. This is a directory of public institutions accredited by Canadian provinces. Some programs offered by private institutions are also included in the list.

Q: What are the requirements for admission into Canadian universities?

A: Each university in Canada has its own policy regarding admission requirements. Your best course of action would be to identify which universities in Canada offer the program which interests you, and then contact them directly regarding their admission requirements. You can find the contact information for each university when you do a search for programs at the Study in Canada website. Just click on the name of the university in the program list and it will link you directly to the university's web site and contact information.

Q: I have been accepted to study English as a Second Language (ESL)/French as a Second Language (FSL) at a private institution in Canada. How can I make sure that it is a good quality program?

A: There are two associations of language schools in Canada (which are soon joining as one association), the Canadian Association of Private Language Schools (CAPLS) and the Canada Language Council (CLC). The members of these associations have undergone quality assessments. You can find their lists of approved programs and members at Languages Canada.

Q: Do I need a Study Permit/Visa? If so, how do I get one?

A: Anyone planning to study for more than six months in Canada needs a Study Permit. If you plan to study for less than six months, but might decide to stay longer, you should apply for a Study Permit before coming to Canada for your studies, as it is very complicated to apply for a Study Permit from within Canada. Citizens of certain countries may also need a Temporary Resident Visa in order to come to Canada for their studies. You can get information about applying for a Study Permit/Visa at Citizenship and Immigration's Studying in Canada page. 

Q: I am a citizen of one country, but have lived in another country for a long time. Where should I apply for a Study Permit/Visa, in my country of citizenship or my country of residence?

A: You can apply for your Study Permit/Visa in your country of residence, your country of nationality or the country where you have been legally admitted. For information on where to send your application, see Citizenship and Immigration's List of countries and corresponding Canadian visa offices page. 

Q: I have finished two years of my program in my home country. I would like to finish the last year of my program in Canada. Will a Canadian institution accept my first two years of study and allow me to start in the third year of the program in Canada?

A: Each university in Canada has its own policy regarding recognition of credits from other institutions. Your best course of action would be to identify which universities in Canada offer the program which interests you, and then contact them directly regarding recognition of your previous studies. You may also want to research if your previous institution has any agreements with institutions in Canada which would allow for credit recognition. The international relations office of your university may be able to help in that regard. You can find the contact information for each university when you do a search for programs at the Study in Canada website. Just click on the name of the university in the program list and it will link you directly to the university's web site and contact information.

Q: I was accepted at a Canadian institution and sent in my application for a Study Permit/Visa a few weeks ago, but I haven't heard anything. Can you tell me when my Study Permit/Visa will come? Can you do anything to speed up the process so I get my Study Permit/Visa right away?

A: Visas and Study Permits are administered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, and any questions regarding applications should be directed to them. Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada has no involvement or influence in regards to Visas and Study Permits.

Q: Can I work in Canada during my studies?

A: Many students are eligible to work part-time during their studies in Canada, either on or off-campus. To find out more, see the Work permits for students page on Citizenship and Immigration Canada's website. Please note that you will need a Work Permit to work off-campus.

Q: Can my spouse work in Canada while I study?

A: Your spouse or common-law partner may apply for a Work Permit if you are a full-time student at an authorised institution and have a Study Permit. For more details see the Work permits for students page on Citizenship and Immigration Canada's website

Q: Can I work in Canada after finishing my studies there?

A: The Post-Graduation Work Program allows some international students to gain Canadian work experience in their field of study. For more information, see the Work permits for students page on Citizenship and Immigration Canada's website. Please note that you will need a Work Permit to work in Canada after finishing your program of study.

Q: I want to come to Canada to do an internship. What do I need to do to get an internship in Canada? How do I find a company to work for?

A: You should look at the information on the Temporary Foreign Worker Program and Trades and Apprenticeship pages on Human Resources and Social Development Canada's website and Industry Canada's Company Directories.

Q: My child is a Canadian citizen, but we have been living outside Canada for many years. How can I find out what grade my child will go into when we return to Canada? Does she need to apply as an international student?

A: Education in Canada is under the jurisdiction of the provinces, so you will need to contact the province where you plan to live. The contact information for each province can be found on the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada website. If you know in which city/community you will live, you may also want to find the contact information for the school board there and contact them directly to find answers to your questions. Your child, as a Canadian citizen, would not be required to apply as an international student, and would not need a Visa or Study Permit.

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Date Modified:
2013-07-05